Can you prioritize what’s important when choosing a school for your daughter?

Here’s a great starting point:  Studies have repeatedly shown that adolescents of both genders benefit from single-gender high schools.  Teens are struggling to form a confident definition of themselves.  A classroom environment without the additional social pressures of being attractive to potential dating partners can sharpen a young person’s focus on academic goals and college readiness.  Women who are self-reliant have had a chance to develop a knowledge of personal worth that’s based on their own core attributes and achievements, not merely on their sense of personal allure.

And here’s another consideration at the top of a parent’s list:  The post-secondary university world and work world that our young people are going to encounter will be more diverse socially, economically, and ethnically than at any previous time in our country’s history.  Young people who are educated in a classroom environment that reflects the richness of human differences realize a positive good from the experience.  They will be better student body members, team members, committee members, workforce members, and better neighbors.  They will understand that variety makes for strength.

 But there’s still another consideration of prime importance:  Today’s young people will launch into a world that is often morally ambiguous.  During this time of learning about oneself, one’s place in the universe, and one’s life-goals and personal moral compass, the best environment will be one that’s also committed to providing an ethical foundation centered on Jesus Christ, the Master of all teachers.  Character grows in an environment where it’s nurtured and respected.

It’s not a matter of finding the one school that answers most of these basic needs, or of sacrificing one consideration to achieve another.  Immaculate Conception Cathedral School holds these priorities as our own, and our commitment is to bring young women into the adult world who are ready for its challenges.

Academic Course Levels

Advanced Placement (AP) Program

The Advanced Placement Program is designed to challenge intellectually gifted students. Students are selected for this program on the basis of standardized test scores, performance in class, grade point average, teacher recommendations, and student commitment. A student enrolled in an AP course is required to take the AP exam and pay the appropriate test fee.

Dual-Enrollment

Dual-Enrollment courses are classes taught on the ICCS campus by an ICCS faculty member who qualifies as ad adjunct Christian Brothers University professor.  Students will earn credits towards ICCS graduation requirements, as well as college credit. This credit can, depending on the requirements set by the college of the student’s choice, be transferred to that college. Students must satisfy the Tennessee Hope Lottery Dual-Enrollment Grant requirements and ICCS requirements to be eligible for these courses.

Honors

Honors level coursework demands that the student demonstrates a higher degree of self-direction and performance. Honors classes will read more outside of class and be assigned more challenging projects. These classes are faster paced, and students will be expected to demonstrate higher-level thinking and problem-solving skills.

Standard/Traditional

Standard or Traditional level coursework prepares students for college academics. These classes offer and require a variety of study skills and learning habits. Students must demonstrate motivation to complete a task, independence in completing assignments, and the readiness to seek help when necessary.

Graduation Requirements

Students must fulfill the following academic requirements for graduation from ICCS:

  • English - 4 units
  • Mathematics - 4 units
  • Science - 4 units
  • Social Science - 3 units
  • Fine Arts - 0.5 units
  • Modern Language - 3 units
  • Health/Wellness - 1.5 units
  • Personal Finance - 0.5
  • Technology - 0.5 units
  • Electives - 3.0 units
  • Theology - 4 units

Total  28 units

Students who have not completed all 28 required units at the end of Senior year will not be allowed to participate in Baccalaureate or in the Graduation ceremony.  Students whose financial obligations are not current at the time of the graduation will not be allowed to participate in Baccalaureate or Graduation.

Fine Arts: Students will receive ½ credit of Fine Arts through the academic class. Some students will advance to higher-level Fine Arts or participate in the school play to earn the addition ½ credit. Other students may attend two evening ICCS Renaissance events to complete the additional ½ credit for Fine Arts.

Mathematics: Students admitted to ICCS freshman year must complete Math through College Algebra. Math credits will be assessed for students transferring to ICCS after freshman year. Summer work may be mandatory.

Modern Language: Three units of the same language are required effective the Class of 2013.

Science: Students must complete science courses in Introduction to Physics and Chemistry, Biology, and Chemistry. For students who qualify for admission to the program, Chemistry and Physics are available through ICCS’ dual-enrollment program with CBU.

Wellness Credit: Students will receive 1 credit of Wellness through the academic class and then must earn another ½ credit through participating in one school activity for 2 consecutive seasons. Students must earn 7 credits per year to advance to the next grade level. Students may not retake a course during a subsequent school year. Should a student fail to earn 7 credits in any given year, a summer school course or tutorial must be completed in order to restore credit in the failed course. In order for a student to maintain enrollment and advance to the next grade level, a minimum of 5 credits must be earned during the academic year. No more than 2 courses may be made up in summer school. Courses for which credit has been restored through summer work will be assigned a passing grade of 70.  Students may not transfer credit for an off-campus course if that course is also offered on the ICCS campus, unless that credit is being recovered after the ICCS course was attempted and failed by the student.

Students must take the ACT or the SAT before graduation.

Students who have not completed enough academic credits by the end of Junior year to secure the prospect of graduation by the end of Senior year will not be re-admitted for senior year.

Curriculum Map

DISCIPLINE

9

10

11

12

MATH

Algebra 1

Geometry

Algebra 2

College Algebra

Pre-Calculus

Calculus

SCIENCE

IPC

Biology

Chemistry

Dual Enrollment

Chemistry thru

CBU

Environmental Issues

Physics

Dual Enrollment

Physics thru CBU

ENGLISH

Intro to Writing and Language

Etymology

American Literature

Popular Fiction

British Literature

AP English Language

Creative Writing

World Literature

AP English Literature

THEOLOGY

THEOLOGY I

Catholic Faith

THEOLOGY II

Scripture Studies

THEOLOGY III

Church History/

World Religion

THEOLOGY IV

Social Justice/

Vocations

SOCIAL SCIENCE

 

Government

AP Government

United States

History

AP-US History

Personal Finance

American Film and

Culture

World History

Crimes Against

Humanity

AP European

History

Sociology

MODERN LANGUAGE

French or Spanish 1

French or Spanish 2

French or Spanish 3

French or Spanish 4

FINE

AND

PERFORMING

ARTS

Studio Art

Schola Cantorum

Drama

Mixed Media

Schola Cantorum

Drama

Advanced Art

Art History

Schola Cantorum

Drama

AP 2D and 3D Art

Ceramics

Schola Cantorum

Drama

Technology

Computer

 

Digital Imaging

Adv. Computer

Photoshop/Yearbook

Wellness

Physical Education

Sports

Clubs

Sports

Clubs

Sports

Clubs

Sports

Clubs